ROUND TABLE 43 – WHAT IS THE #1 LESSON YOU’VE LEARNED FROM ONE OF YOUR PLAYERS OR TEAMS OVER THE COURSE OF YOUR COACHING CAREER? – EPISODE 661

Round Table 43

Welcome to the 43rd edition of the Coach’s Corner Round Table on the Hoop Heads Podcast. Each episode of the Coach’s Corner Round Table will feature our All-Star lineup of guests answering a single basketball question.  A new Coach’s Corner Round Table will drop around the 15th of each month.

July’s Round Table question is:  What is the #1 lesson you’ve learned from one of your players or teams over the course of your coaching career?

Our Coaching Lineup this month:

Please enjoy this Round Table episode of the Hoop Heads Podcast and once you’re finished listening please give the show a five star rating and review after you subscribe on your favorite podcast app..

If you are a basketball coach at any level please check out our Hoop Heads Coaching Mentorship Program.  You’ll get matched with one of our experienced Head Coaches and develop a relationship that will help take your coaching, your team, your program, and your mindset to another level.

Be sure to follow us on Twitter and Instagram @hoopheadspod for the latest updates on episodes, guests, and events from the Hoop Heads Pod.

Like this show? Please leave us a review here — even one sentence helps! Consider including your Twitter handle so we can thank you personally!

Become a Patron!
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DrDish-Rec.jpg

We’re excited to partner with Dr. Dish, the world’s best shooting machine! Mention the Hoop Heads Podcast when you place your order and get $300 off a brand new state of the art Dr. Dish Shooting Machine!

Prepare like the pros with the all new FastDraw and FastScout. FastDraw has been the number one play diagramming software for coaches for years, and now with it’s integrated web platform, coaches have the ability to add video to plays and share them directly to their players Android and iPhones via their mobile app. Coaches can also create customized scouting reports,  upload and send game and practice film straight to the mobile app. Your players and staff have never been as prepared for games as they will after using FastDraw & FastScout. You’ll see quickly why FastModel Sports has the most compelling and intuitive basketball software out there! In addition to a great product, they also provide basketball coaching content and resources through their blog and playbank, which features over 8,000 free plays and drills from their online coaching community. For access to these plays and more information, visit fastmodelsports.com or follow them on Twitter @FastModel. 

The Coacing Portfolio

Your first impression is everything when applying for a new coaching job.  A professional coaching portfolio is the tool that highlights your coaching achievements and philosophies and, most of all, helps separate you and your abilities from the other applicants.

The key to landing a new coaching job is to demonstrate to the hiring committee your attention to detail, level of preparedness, and your professionalism.  Not only does a coaching portfolio allow you to exhibit these qualities, it also allows you to present your personal philosophies on coaching, leadership, and program development in an organized manner.

The Coaching Portfolio Guide is an instructional, membership-based website that helps you develop a personalized portfolio.  Each section of the portfolio guide provides detailed instructions on how to organize your portfolio in a professional manner.  The guide also provides sample documents for each section of your portfolio that you can copy, modify, and add to your personal portfolio.

THANKS COACHES!

If you enjoyed this episode let our coaches know by clicking on the links below and sending them a quick shout out on Twitter:

Click here to thank Dominic Amorosa on Twitter!

Click here to thank Erik Buehler on Twitter!

Click here to thank Joe Crispin on Twitter!

Click here to thank Joe Harris on Twitter!

Click here to thank Tim Jackson on Twitter!

Click here to thank Bob Krizancic on Twitter!

Click here to thank Dell Leonard on Twitter!

Click here to thank Matt Monroe on Twitter!

Click here to thank Matthew Raidbard on Twitter!

Click here to thank John Shulman on Twitter!

Click here to thank Joe Stasyszyn on Twitter!

Click here to let Mike & Jason know about your number one takeaway from this episode!

And if you want us to answer your questions on one of our upcoming weekly NBA episodes, drop us a line at mike@hoopheadspod.com.

TRANSCRIPT FOR ROUND TABLE 43 – WHAT IS THE #1 LESSON YOU’VE LEARNED FROM ONE OF YOUR PLAYERS OR TEAMS OVER THE COURSE OF YOUR COACHING CAREER? – EPISODE 661

[00:00:00] Narrator: The Hoop Heads Podcast is brought to you by Head Start Basketball.

[00:00:21] Mike Klinzing: Hello, and welcome to the 42nd edition of the Coach’s Corner Round Table on the Hoop Heads Podcast. Each episode of the Coach’s Corner Round Table, will feature our all-star lineup of guests answering a single basketball question, a new Coach’s Corner Round Table will drop around the 15th of each month

July’s Round Table Question is… What is the number one lesson you’ve learned from one of your players or teams over the course of your coaching career?

Our Coaching Lineup this month:

Please enjoy this Round Table episode of the Hoop Heads Podcast and once you’re finished listening please give the show a five star rating and review after you subscribe on your favorite podcast app.

If you’re a basketball coach at any level, please check out our Hoop Heads coaching mentorship program.  You’ll get matched with one of our experienced head coaches and develop a relationship that will take your coaching, your team, your program, and your mindset to another level.

Be sure to follow us on Twitter and Instagram @hoopheadspod for the latest updates on episodes, guests and events from the Hoop Heads Pod.

Hey Hoop Heads! I wanted to take a minute to shout out our partners and friends at Dr. Dish Basketball, their Dr. Dish shooting machines are undoubtedly the most advanced and user-friendly machines on the market. Save up to $4,000 on multi-unit orders in the month of July. Learn more at drdishbasketball.com.  Follow their incredible content @drdishbball on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and YouTube. Mention the Hoop Heads Podcast and save an extra $300 on the Dr. Dish Rebel, All-Star and CT models. Visit drdishbasketball.com for details. That’s a great deal Hoop Heads. Get your Dr. Dish Shooting Machine, today.

Dominic Amorosa:   Hi, this is Dominic Amorosa, head boys basketball coach Strake Jesuit College Prep in Houston, Texas, and you’re listening to the Hoop Heads Podcast.

[00:02:44] Matt Monroe:

[00:02:47] Mike Klinzing: If you’re looking to improve your coaching, please consider joining the Hoop Heads Mentorship Program. We believe that having a mentor is the best way to maximize your potential and become a transformational coach.  Matching you up with one of our experienced mentors, you’ll develop a one-on-one relationship that will help your coaching, your team, your program, and your mindset.

The Hoop Heads Mentorship Program delivers mentoring services to basketball coaches at all levels through our team of experienced head coaches.  Find out more at hoopheadspod.com or shoot me an email directly. Mike@hoopheadspod.com.

Follow us on social media @hoopheadspod on Twitter and Instagram. And be sure to check out the Hoop Heads Podcast Network for more great basketball content.

Prepare like the pros with the all-new Fast Draw and Fast Scout. Fast Draw has been the number one play diagramming software for coaches for years. You’ll quickly see why Fast Model Sports has the most compelling and intuitive basketball software out there. For a limited time, Fast Model is offering Hoop Heads listeners 15% off Fast Draw and Fast Scout.

Just use the code HHP15 at checkout to grab your discount and you’ll be [00:03:00] on your way to more efficient game prep and improved communication with your team. Fast Model also has new coaching content every week on their blog, plus play and drill diagrams in its play bank. Check out the links in the show notes for more. Fast Model Sports is the best in basketball.

Let’s hear from our panel about the number one lesson they’ve learned from one of their players or teams over the course of their coaching careers.

[00:04:27] Mike Klinzing: Dominic Amorosa, Strike Jesuit College Prep in Houston, Texas.

[00:04:35] Mike Klinzing: This is Dominic Amorosa from Strake Jesuit in Houston. One of the things I’ve learned from players over the years is to give them the benefit of the doubt, especially when it comes to making final decisions.

Eric Buer

[00:04:48] Mike Klinzing:  Erik Buehler Chatfield Senior High School, Littleton, Colorado.

[00:04:54] Erik Buehler: Hey, what’s going on everybody. This is Erik Buehler from Chatfield Senior High. And this month we were asked, what’s a lesson that we’ve learned from a player or a team that we’ve coached. And a major one that comes to mind for me is actually a player that I had graduate this past year who had cerebral palsy and he had very limited use of his whole right side and his whole life and his whole basketball career. He had to learn how to basically just use his left side, his left hand and then just kind of overcompensate in every other area. Aside from the physical side of basketball to actually become a starter and become a varsity basketball player.

And he actually finished fourth in the state and three pointers made this past season in the highest division in Colorado. And the lesson that I learned from him was. Find a way. And just because there’s a traditional way of doing something or a traditional way of looking or playing basketball doesn’t mean that’s the only way and Parker, this player that.

They had these limitations. He just always found a way to overcome and to be actually elite and Excel. And one of the best that I’ve ever coached in many other areas of the game. And because of that, I’m really hoping he gets into coaching cuz he’s one of the smartest basketball minds I’ve ever been around.

But there’s always a way other than traditional way to figure something out and to overcome. So that’s the lesson I’ve learned, hopefully that helps someone else out there. Hope everyone else out there is doing good. Having a great summer. And I’ll talk to you guys next time,

[00:06:30] Mike Klinzing: Joe Crispin, Rowan University,

[00:06:35] Joe Crispin: Joe Crispin, Head Men’s Basketball Coach at Rowan University.

The number one thing I’ve learned from my players naturally could choose a variety of things, but I think the biggest one is just taking the time to listen to. because if I listen, well, they’ll tell me who they wanna be. And I mean that both individually and collectively I think this is very hard to do.

We often have a vision for who we want a team to be, and sometimes we don’t pay enough attention to what the players actually want individually and collectively and what our limitations. and I think a lot of times our limitations are the best guide and, and one of those limitations are literally what the players want.

Individually, this means if you watch them play, which I often spend a lot of time doing at the beginning of a season, they’re gonna tell you what they wanna become great at. They’re they’re gonna tell you what they can contribute to the team and it might not be exactly what you think. Not only that they’re gonna tell you what they’re willing to work on in the off season.

And if you show that you’re willing to listen to them and work with them and encourage them to do those things and work on, let’s just say it’s, you know, shooting open jumpers for guys who might not naturally be inclined to it. They’re gonna work harder in the off season to become good at those things for your future.

And the same thing is collectively some teams may not want it as much as other teams. I’ve found that if maybe you loosen the reigns a little bit and, and are a little more relaxed with those groups, they actually exceed their own expectations. Other groups are very clear that they want a championship.

They wanna win every game. And naturally those are the easiest to work with. But oftentimes I do a simple exercise with individuals and teams and I just ask them, what do we want? What do you want? I let ’em define it. And then the next question is, okay, now what do we need to do to get what you want?

Or what we. And often the answers become pretty clean. So I’m not always the best listener. But that’s something I’m always working on. Listen to our players in action and word indeed. And they’ll often tell you what they want and what they can become. Great at

[00:08:44] Mike Klinzing: Joe Harris, Lake Chelan High School, Lake Chelan, Washington.

[00:08:53] Joe Harris: Hello Hoop Heads! This is Joe Harris at Lake Chelan High School with today’s round table question. It asks us, what is the number one lesson you’ve learned from one of your players or teams over the course of your coaching career? There are many lessons. The game of basketball can teach any of us. The game has taught me one of these lessons early on in my career.

The lesson that I learned was your players want you to care for them and they, and they need us more off the court than they do as a coach on the. We are really more than coaches. We are role models, mentors, and some, and a sometime confidant. Just to name a few as coaches, it’s very easy for us to get caught up in just the Xs and OS the scouting of our opponents.

Some player development to name a few, but our players want. Want to know that we care more about them than just on the court. Basketball really is just a tool for us to help them navigate their way through life. And each of our players has a story to tell, and we should always listen for that story. The trust that this creates when you show that you do listen and do care about them a about, more than just basketball will always pay great dividends on the court and beyond it, it’s a bond that you and your players and teams will share well beyond the playing days.

Appreciate you having me on this episode. Keep growing your game.

[00:10:09] Mike Klinzing: Tim Jackson, author of “Understanding College Athletics Through the Eyes of College Athletes”

[00:10:21] Tim Jackson: This is Tim Jackson, former basketball player at Canton McKinley, Hall of Famer from Youngstown State and current author of “Understanding College Athletics Through the Eyes of College Athletes”

The most important lesson I learned from coaching is that winning is not everything. I was taught that as a player, that winning is everything. But as a coach, I learned that improve. Commitment to players through thicker, through thin and enjoying the, enjoying the journey and not just the wins and losses losing his heart, but players not enjoying the ride is tougher to deal with in the bigger picture of life.

So I would say the most important lesson for me when I was coaching was making sure that my players grew as people improved. As athletes and enjoyed the journey and not just focus on wins and losses.

[00:11:28] Mike Klinzing: Bob Krizancic, Mentor High School, Mentor, Ohio,

[00:11:37] Bob Krizancic: The most important thing I learned from my players and at a very, very early age in my coaching career was that they were not gonna be all in. To my program, to our team, unless they knew that I was all in to them in their lives, their academics, their future, their success.

Once I learned that and that we built that relationship things were so much easier and it was the only way to coach right now after 40 some years and in my coaching career. We do so many things together as a team and their families, you know, I believe that we are a family and we start the season off right at the beginning with a cookout with not only parents, players, cheerleaders, but also all the siblings.

So again, invest in your players, their future, their academics. Try to make them elite in every way possible. And I guarantee you, your coaching career will be so much better.

[00:12:45] Mike Klinzing: Your first impression is everything. When applying for a new coaching job, a professional coaching portfolio is the tool that highlights your coaching achievements and philosophies. And most of all, it helps separate you and your abilities from the other applicants. The Coaching Portfolio Guide is an instructional, membership based website that helps you develop a personalized portfolio.

Each section of a portfolio guide provides detailed instructions on how to organize your portfolio in a professional manner. The guide also provides sample documents for each section of your portfolio that you can modify and add your personal portfolio. As a Hoop Heads Pod listener you can get your Coaching Portfolio Guide for just $25.

Visit coachingportfolioguide.com/hopheads  to learn more.

[00:13:36] Mike Klinzing: Dell Leonard, Mountain Home High School, Mountain Home, Arkansas.

[00:13:42] Dell Leonard: What is the number one lesson you’ve learned from one of your players or teams over the course of your coaching career? When I read this several answers that me Lee came to mind. I’m sure any coach who’s been in this profession long enough has experienced these same lessons.

I learned early in my career that all players respond differently. What works for one does not work for the other. That was a hard adjustment for me as a young coach. We’ve all heard the old saying, if you care for them and you are fair, you will get the most out of them. I think that we have to treat all players fairly, but we also have to remember that fair is not the same for every player’s situation.

You may have to understand what is fair, depending on their personal needs. Fair doesn’t have the same meaning for every player. You have to be aware of what’s going on in their. You have to be aware of their home situation outside the game school and basketball may be the only place they feel needed important or part of something a school day or a basketball road trip may be the only place they get a good meal.

I learn that sometimes we don’t realize or see their most talented players our starters or our kids who get a lot of. Minutes or media attention. They still need words of affirmation on, on that same note in high school, your role players may not be college bound players, but you still have to invest in their lives in their high school careers and let them know how important they are to the team.

Another lesson that I look back on is don’t be so quick to dismiss a player. If a player makes a mistake and they are regretful of the mistake, don’t be too proud to give them a second chance. Sometimes those players have the greatest success stories on that same note. Don’t get too comfortable with players.

They all can change quickly in closing. If I had to give just one answer to this week’s question, it would be. Don’t judge a kid by their parents. Sometimes a kid has nothing to do with their parents’ actions. This is hard, but you have to remember that your job is to help the kid and they don’t get to pick who their parents are.

[00:15:59] Mike Klinzing: Matt Monroe, Saint Ignatius, College Prep in Chicago, Illinois.

[00:16:07] Matt Monroe: One of the most rewarding aspects of coaching is having the opportunity each year to learn from the players and teams in which you coach. Over the years, I have learned a ton of valuable lessons each season that have not only made me a stronger coach, but a better person as well. It is hard to pick which lesson is the number one most valuable lesson I have learned since there have been so many.

However this past season that my team at Sandy Ignatius’s college prep in Chicago had is a great example of some of the lessons you can learn from your players, your teams, and your fellow coaches. We started the season ranked number four in the state and had the highest preseason expectations on our programs.

100 plus year history. We loaded up our schedule with a ton of challenging games, hoping to prepare ourselves for a deep playoff run in March. From the first tip though, our team experienced several challenges and many ups and downs. Despite our high expectations, we started the season three and four with some close losses to quality teams.

After those first seven games, we began to really hit our stride, beating a few of our rivals in playing some of the best basketball of the season. Then in the middle of December, COVID hit our. We had an 11 day pause from practicing and a 16 day break from playing any games. When we came back as a team for our Christmas tournament, at the end of the month, we were way behind where we normally would be.

And it felt like our team started preseason all over again. We dropped some games. We were not expected to and fell to eight and seven going into by far our toughest stretch of the season. As we played six straight games against teams ranked in the top 25. No matter what our team stuck together. They never stopped believing in our program in our team.

And most importantly, in themselves, the unbreakable bonds that our kids developed through their years of preparation paid off greatly, was there disappointment and frustration about our slow start? Definitely did people on the outside looking in loose faith in our team. Sure. However, our players and coaches never.

The first game we played against the toughest part of our schedule. We lost on a last second buzzer beater while a lot of teams would’ve folded, our players began to believe in themselves even more. We went on to win our next four games against highly ranked opponents. Now the rest of the season, wouldn’t be without adversity.

As we suffered through some injuries and dropped a few more close games. However, we used that adversity to grow stronger together and ended up advancing to the final four in the state playoffs in March the best finish in our school’s history, our players and team this year taught me many valuable lessons, ones in which I believe were the reason for our success at the very end of the year among those lessons were the importance of playing for each other.

The value of adversity as a tool to grow and the impact of never losing faith in yourself and your teammates. Most importantly, our team showed that if you build unbreakable bonds and love each other, no matter what anything is possible, as long as you always stick together,

[00:19:09] Narrator: Matthew Raidbard, author of “Lead Like a Pro”

[00:19:18] Matthew Raidbard: Hey Hoop Heads nation. This is coach Matt Raidbard here with you. Glad to be back for another hooped round table. Talking about the number one lesson that I’ve learned from one of my players and teams over the course of my coaching career. And this is definitely one where as soon as I read the question, I immediately knew what that lesson was.

It was one of my players who eventually became an assistant coach on our staff who told me that the team and the player’s personality is a reflection of the head coach. And at first, when he said that to me, I didn’t exactly understand what he meant. You know, I had, you know, if a head coach is tough or a head coach is resilient, you could see that reflect on the team.

But when he said personality, that was something I hadn’t really considered before, but I was really interested. And as we talked more about it, I, I really understood that. It’s not just about some of those, you know, really overt characteristics like toughness or resiliency or you know, being really larger than life.

Right. That’s exhibited in your team. It’s also a lot of your little behaviors, you know, your attention to detail your collaboration, your communication, all those aspects of your personality become reflected in your team because your team is exposed to them over and over day after day. And especially when you’re experiencing success, the team will really latch onto a lot of those personality traits and adopt them.

But also when you’re experiencing challenging times, your team can rebel against them because they feel like they’re not working and they don’t wanna be exhibiting those themselves. So that was a, a piece of advice. And, and a lesson that I learned from one of my players that I thought was really important, and I’ve always carried with me that the team is a reflection of the personality of the head coach.

All right. Thanks. Hoop heads nation. Appreciate you having me on this month’s round table.

[00:21:16] Mike Klinzing: John Shulman, University of Alabama, Huntsville, and the 720 sports group.

[00:21:23] John Shulman: This is John Shulman, Head Basketball Coach at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. And the question, pretty simple question. What is the number one lesson you’ve learned from one of your players or teams over the course of your coaching career?

I guess the, the number one lesson and I’ve learned a lot, but the number one lesson and the biggest lesson that I’ve learned is once you get back with those guys after it’s over and you get a little older, like I am, and you get with your guys and They don’t ever talk about the games they don’t ever talk about.

Boy, that, that lost stung or that win was incredible. It it’s the journey and it’s the little things. And, you know, we get caught up in the moment of winning and losing at the moment, but they’re not, you know, they wanna win. They don’t hurt as bad as coaches and they don’t celebrate as high as coaches.

And they’re not focused on that. They, they want a better experience. They want a great experience. They want to have fun. They wanna play, you know, we don’t wanna play good people. As coaches, because it may affect our record. They don’t care. They wanna play good people. They wanna play in cool venues. They wanna do fun things.

No, we can’t go out and get good food that night. We gotta focus on the game. They wanna go to Japanese steakhouse and hang out and have a blast before the game. We have to realize that it really is not about us. And it’s about them. Will Heley football coach at C. It’s it’s all about the kids’ experience at Charlotte football.

Like it was at Austin P football. It’s all about the kids’ experience. Are they having a great experience? If they’re having a great experience, they’ll end up playing harder for you and you’ll accidentally win, win basketball games, win football games, whatever you’re coaching. So I guess the biggest lesson is, you know, folks on the kids.

Focus on the kids, focus on the process, quit worrying about winning and losing games and focus on the kids. And, and I think everything will work out how it’s supposed to work out. And remember, once everything’s said and done, and they’re 45 years old, that loss, wherever on that Thursday night that you thought was.

Devastating. They don’t even remember it nor do they care about it, but they do care that time that you remember their birthday or they, or maybe something had happened with their family. And you reached out to ’em. They remember that they remember the little things along the way in the journey and you being there for them as family, they may not remember every game as we do as coaches.

So I think we need to change our mindset. And just focus on those kids. That doesn’t mean I’m not saying be soft on I’m saying, love them. Be tough, accountable, responsible, and reliable, and they’ll have amazing experience. This helps

[00:24:31] Mike Klinzing: Joe Stasyszyn Unleashed Potential Carlisle, Pennsylvania.

[00:24:38] Joe Stasyszyn: Joe Stasyszyn Unleashed Potential Carlisle, Pennsylvania.

This month’s question is what is the number one lesson you learned from one of your teams throughout your coaching career? I would say the number one lesson I learned, and it wasn’t just one team. Well, really well, one primary team, but different teams throughout my coaching career. Number one lesson that I learned is.

For me, the teams with maybe not as much talent as other teams that I have coached actually accomplished more success than some of the more talented teams that I coached when I was the head coach at Cardell high school here in Pennsylvania. And the reason for that I think is, you know, especially out one team, I’m thinking of particularly in 2000 and.

They were by far, collectively, not the most talented team, but they all hung out together on the court. I mean, they got along very well together on the court. They got along very well together off the court. They were all bought in. They weren’t worried about. Who was going to get the credit for winning.

They actually enjoyed sharing the credit of winning and they were perfect teammates. They were coachable. The buy-in was there. They worked hard, they communicated with each other. They weren’t jealous of each other. You know, I had teams that were very much more talented than that team and a couple of the other teams with less talent.

It really taught me early on that you don’t have to have the most talented teams to win actually team chemistry, chemistry and bonding were much more important than talent because a lot of times you have very talented teams. There’s a lot of egos, a lot of jealousy they’re worried about, you know, who was gonna be the high score, who was getting more colleges looking at them.

So, you know, throughout my career, I, I would say that’s one of the biggest lessons that I’ve learned. From a team or maybe a couple of teams that teams that don’t have as much talent sometimes can take, can take themselves farther, you know, into the district playoffs, into the state playoffs, then teams that maybe were supposed to, to make it that far.

And it’s interesting because now when I look back and I talk to some of those, you know, some of those, those players on their more talented teams, I think they come to the realization and understanding. You know what it, it should have been more about the team, not about them. I think now that they, they realize that they wish that maybe they would’ve done things differently when they played the game, instead of, you know, they always say there’s no I in team.

So, you know, again, the teams that bond together have great relationships, great team cohesion, camaraderie, I think, you know, as a coach, a lot of times, and I, I, they’re probably my favorite teams also. Because no one expected them to go as far as they did. Whether again, whether it’s the district playoffs and state playoffs.

And I can think of that 2017 in particular, that they went to these semifinals at a district. They went into the state playoffs and they just had a very, very, very great season. And, and that’s one of the, that’s one of the teams that I really take a lot of, of pride in and, and one of the team, one of my favorite teams to coach.

So that would be my answer for this month. Thank you.

[00:27:58] Mike Klinzing: Mike Klinzing: Thanks for checking out this month’s Hoop Heads Podcast Round Table. We’ll be back next month with another question for our all-star lineup of coaches.

[00:28:15] Narrator: Thanks for listening to the Hoop Heads Podcast presented by Head Start Basketball.