ROUND TABLE 27 – WHAT IS THE WORST COACHING ADVICE YOU HAVE EVER BEEN GIVEN? – EPISODE 444

Round Table 27

Hello and Welcome to the 27th edition of the Coach’s Corner Round Table on the Hoop Heads Podcast. Each episode of the Coach’s Corner Round Table will feature our All-Star lineup of guests answering a single basketball question.  A new Coach’s Corner Round Table will drop around the 15th of each month.

March’s Round Table question is:  What is the worst coaching advice you have ever been given?

Our Coaching Lineup this month:

  • Chris DeLisio – Olmsted Falls (OH) High School
  • Dave Grendzynski – Host of the Courtside Culture Podcast
  • Dell Leonard – Mountain Home (AR) High School
  • Don Showalter – USA Basketball
  • John Shulman – University of Alabama Huntsville
  • Lee Swanson – Bunker Hill (NC) High School

Please enjoy this Round Table episode of the Hoop Heads Podcast and once you’re finished listening please give the show a five star rating and review. If you are a basketball coach at any level please check out our Hoop Heads Coaching Mentorship Program.  You’ll get matched with one of our experienced Head Coaches and develop a relationship that will help take your coaching, your team, your program, and your mindset to another level.

And don’t forget to check out our Hoop Heads Pod Network of shows including Thrive with Trevor Huffman, Beyond the Ball, The CoachMays.com Podcast, Player’s Court, Bleachers & Boards, The Green Light, Courtside Culture and our team focused NBA Podcasts: Cavalier Central, Knuck if you Buck, The 305 Culture, #Lakers, Motor City Hoops, X’s and O’s: NBA Breakdown, Spanning the Spurs, LA Hoops, The Wizards Hoops Analyst & At The Buzzer. We’re looking for more NBA podcasters interested in hosting their own show centered on a particular team. Email us info@hoopheadspod.com if you’re interested in learning more and bringing your talent to our network.

Let’s hear from our coaches about the worst coaching advice they’ve ever received.

Like this show? Please leave us a review here — even one sentence helps! Consider including your Twitter handle so we can thank you personally!

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THANKS COACHES!

If you enjoyed this episode let our coaches know by clicking on the link below and sending them a quick shout out on Twitter:

Click here to thank Chris DeLisio on Twitter!

Click here to thank Dave Gryndzynski on Twitter!

Click here to thank Dell Leonard on Twitter!

Click here to thank Don Showalter on Twitter!

Click here to thank John Shulman on Twitter!

Click here to thank Lee Swanson on Twitter!

Click here to let Mike & Jason know about your number one takeaway from this episode!

And if you want us to answer your questions on one of our upcoming weekly NBA episodes, drop us a line at mike@hoopheadspod.com.

TRANSCRIPT FOR ROUND TABLE 27 – WHAT IS THE WORST COACHING ADVICE YOU HAVE EVER BEEN GIVEN? – EPISODE 444

[00:00:00] Narrator: [00:00:00] The Hoop Heads Podcast is brought to you by Head Start Basketball.

Mike Klinzing: [00:00:25] I wanted to take a minute to shout out our partners and friends at Dr. Dish Basketball. Their Dr. Dish shooting machines are undoubtedly the most advanced and user-friendly machines on the market and they truly accelerate skill development faster than ever. Learn more at Dr. Dish Basketball.com and follow their incredible content at DrDishBball on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and YouTube. Mentioned the Hoop Heads Podcast and save an extra $300 on the Dr. Dish Rebel, All-Star and CT models. Also make sure to check out the new Dr. Dish home machine, which is perfect for these crazy times. [00:01:00] when gyms and schools are closed. Visit Dr. Dish basketball.com for details.

That’s a great deal Hoop Heads! Get your doctor does shooting machine today.

Hi, this is Travis Schwab Head Men’s Basketball Coach at Muskingum University, and you’re listening to the Hoop Heads Podcast.

Mike Klinzing: [00:01:24] Prepare like the pros with the all new FastDraw and FastScout. FastDraw’s been the number one play diagramming software for coaches for years. You’ll quickly see why Fast Model Sports has the most compelling and intuitive basketball software out there. For a limited time Fast Model is offering new subscribers, 10% off Fast Draw and Fast Scout. Just use the code, save10 at checkout to grab your discount and you’ll be on your way to more efficient game prep and improved communication with your team. Fast Model also has new coaching content every week on its blog. Plus play and drill [00:02:00] diagrams on its playbook. Check out the links in the show notes for more information.  Fast Model Sports is the best in basketball.

Hello and welcome to the 27th edition of the coach’s corner round table on the Hoop Heads Podcast. Each episode of the coach’s corner round table, will feature our all-star lineup of guests answering a single basketball question.  A new coach’s corner round table drops around the 15th of each month.

March’s round table question is, “What is the worst coaching advice you have ever been given?

Our coaching lineup this month includes:

  • Chris DeLisio – Olmsted Falls (OH) High School
  • Dave Grendzynski – Host of the Courtside Culture Podcast
  • Dell Leonard – Mountain Home (AR) High School
  • Don Showalter – USA Basketball
  • John Shulman – University of Alabama Huntsville
  • Lee Swanson – Bunker Hill (NC) High School

Please enjoy this round table episode of the Hoop Heads Podcast. And once you’re finished listening, please give the show a five star rating and review. If [00:04:00] you’re a basketball coach at any level, please check out our Hoop Heads coaching mentorship program.

You’ll get matched with one of our experienced head coaches and develop a relationship that will take your coaching, your team, your program, and your mindset to another level.

And don’t forget to check out our Hoop Heads Pod Network of shows, including Thrive with Trevor Hoffman, Beyond the Ball, The CoachMays.com Podcast, Players Court, Bleachers and Boards, The Green Light, Courtside Culture and our NBA team focused podcasts, Cavalier Central, Knuck If you Buck, 305 Culture, Hashtag Lakers, Motor City Hoops, X’s and O’s NBA Breakdown, Spanning the Spurs, LA Hoops, The Wizards Hoops Analyst, and At the Buzzer, we’re looking for more NBA podcasters interested in hosting their own show centered on a particular team, email us info@hoopheadspod.com if you’re interested in learning more and bringing your talent to our network.

Let’s hear from our coaches about the worst coaching advice they’ve [00:04:00] ever written.

Mike Klinzing: [00:04:03] Lisieux, Olmsted Falls High School,  Olmsted Falls, Ohio.

Chris DeLisio: [00:04:09] Hey Hoop Heads, Chris DeLisio, Olmsted Falls and answering the question about worst coaching advice I’ve ever been given. And to be honest, I can’t think I’ve ever gotten a bad piece of coaching advice. I think that all the coaching advice I’ve ever gotten is all coming from a good place.

And with things that have worked for other people, and it’s not to say that everything is going to work for you and I think that with all coaching advice and all guidance and anything that you get from a coaching standpoint, it’s something that you’ve got to sift through and think about if it works for you or if it works for your program at your school.

But I think that I’m just pretty appreciative that any coaches would be willing to give me any advice at all to try to help. And I can’t even count any of his bad. It might even be something that you [00:05:00] think about is something that might work for another coach, but it just might not be the best thing for you, but that’s how you might get to a different solution with whatever it is that your problem is.

So hopefully that helps

Mike Klinzing: [00:05:17] Dave Grendzynski, host of the Courtside Culture Podcast.

Dave Grendzynski: [00:05:24] Honestly, the worst coaching advice I’ve ever gotten is to be consistent. Every time I asked about my game and how I could help the team, he replied consistency. You gotta be consistent. Well, who doesn’t want to be consistent? I mean, everybody wants to be a consistent three point shooter or a consistent finisher, or be someone who does a good job of consistently guarding their man on the perimeter.

To me, that advice is just coaching the obvious. Instead, I would tell a player, something like, Hey, you’re consistently getting to the free-throw line, but if you can improve the number of free throws you make by just two percentage points, [00:06:00] you can add three to five points to your stat line every game.

Now that player knows exactly what part of his game to work on to help himself and the team. So coaches, the next time one of your players comes to you and asks, am I doing everything I need to be doing to help the team? Don’t tell them be consistent, give them a smart goal. Instead, something that’s specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and time-based, it’s a better option every time.

Mike Klinzing: [00:06:28] Dell Leonard, Mountain Home High School, Mountain Home, Arkansas

Dell Leonard: [00:06:35] Dell Leonard, Mountain Home, Arkansas. Early in my career. I had a coach who I have tremendous respect for still to this day, tell me that I don’t need to get too close or too personal with my players. And I know what the coach was trying to tell me, but I was a young male coaching high school [00:07:00] girls. And there was a time where a kid was having a rough game, came off the floor and I just kinda lightly tapped her on top of the head as she walked by to let her know, Hey, we’re going to be okay. And I had that same coach say, Hey, you don’t need to be touching them because you’re a man and you’re coaching girls.

And that may have been the case back in the day. But I think the most important thing is to build relationships and trust with your players and they’ll run through a brick wall for you. So that might’ve been one of the worst bits of advice that I ever received because I was real standoffish and I’m not really approachable for awhile.

And I think that hurt the relationship that I could have built with some players early in my career. So even though that coach was trying to be very helpful and meantvwell, looking back, I think that may have been the worst bit of advice that I ever got from another coach.

[00:08:00] Narrator: [00:08:01] Don Showalter, USA basketball.

Don Showalter: [00:08:07] Hi, Don Showalter here from USA basketball. The question is what is the worst coaching advice I ever received? That is really a difficult one because I think most of the coaching advice I received throughout my career has been really good. I think the one, maybe the one thing that I did receive that I question and look back on was a coach told me one time that the skill development will always come through all your scrimmages, your five on five. So there’s really very little need for skill development. And I thought about that and I as a young coach, I bought into that a little bit, but then I realized skill development cannot be based solely on your five on five work.

It has to be done individually. It’s gotta be done outside the [00:09:00] season as well. And you’re really not going to get a lot better, just playing five on five. So that’s probably the worst  information I received from a coach in my years of coaching,

Mike Klinzing: [00:09:17] John Shulman University of Alabama, Huntsville and the 720 Sports Group.

John Shulman: [00:09:23] This is John Shulman, head coach at University of Alabama in Huntsville.  Thequestion is what’s the worst piece of coaching advice I’ve ever gotten? That’s a tough question. I will say this I think all advice that’s given to you can be a positive, no matter if it’s bad or good, people don’t know your situation, people don’t know your team like you know your team. People don’t know your situation in life with your family like you do. And I mean, I’ve been [00:10:00] given a lot of advice on go to this job or don’t take that job, you have to listen to it and then you gotta kind of find your own niche to it. You have to listen to you and your family and not to others, but I think you do have to listen and someone’s trying to critique your team and trying to give you advice.

I do think you have to listen to it, but I don’t think you have to do it, but I do think sometimes you got to I’ve always been under the rule. If you listen to the fans, You’ll be right beside them one day. And I did listen to the fans and I was right beside of them and I didn’t like that.

I did not like that view. So I think you have to listen, but you’ve got to sift through what’s real and what’s not real. And [00:11:00] my biggest thing that I do now, If I wouldn’t take advice from somebody, I’m not going to take criticism from that person. So if I don’t have any respect for that person, I’m not listening to that person.

As they critique me, I will be critiqued by the people I want to be critiqued by and given advice by the people wanting to be given advice. But as you get older that kind of stops. And so I know I’m rambling, but everybody’s gonna have an opinion and everybody’s going to give you advice, whether it be good or bad.

Have I had bad advice? Absolutely. Have I taught and someone told me to take this job. Absolutely, but you just gotta do what you do and what’s right. And you gotta be able to sleep at night. You gotta be able to put your head on the pillow and be able to sleep and you gotta, you gotta be able to, if you [00:12:00] lose a game, you gotta be able to deal with it and not blame it on anybody else except yourself.

And just say, Hey man, we weren’t good enough. But if you start listening to others and start doing things, that are out of your comfort zone and out of your character, then just to be honest, that’s your fault for listening and for taking the advice. So hopefully this helps a little bit, I know I’m rambling, but we’re all going to be given good advice and bad advice. It’s just up to us what we want to do with it. So hope this helps. Good luck during tournament time and good luck as we head towards the spring and hopefully head towards some normalcy. Thank you.

Mike Klinzing: [00:12:38] Lee Swanson, Bunker Hill High School Claremont, North Carolina

Lee Swanson: [00:12:45] Like oftentimes as coaches, maybe some of the worst advice we get are often stuck in old cliches. I know for me as a when I was a younger coach, definitely that was true on the idea that anybody can beat anybody on any given night. A lot of times that’s just [00:13:00] not true. If there was a huge talent gap, that’s just not a thing.

Or we’re going to outwork everybody every single day. And that may be true. Our program might do that, but if there’s a huge talent gap then I think that as a coach, sometimes you can become disillusioned and you can burn out when you’re not realistic about where your program is.

We all hope to get to that point one day where we can get our programs to the mountain top, but I think that being realistic is really good advice for young coaches to know that some of these cliches aren’t necessarily true. It can’t be a grind all the time or you will burn out. And I think as a younger coach sometimes some of those things that old adage is used to get in the way.

Coach Brotherton in Texas often talks about these things with me and he’s really shed some light and given me some good advice. And I’ll say this from the coaching community, most of the advice I’ve been given in my career has been solid and good, and people have been looking out for me. A lot of times the negative coaching advice comes from [00:14:00] things that just aren’t necessarily true.

So I would try to say steer away from some of the old adages. Maybe good advice for coaches just getting in.

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We’ll be back next month with another question for our all-star lineup of coaches. [00:16:00]

Thanks for listening to the podcast presented by Head Start Basketball.

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