ROUND TABLE 36 – HOW DO YOU DEVELOP LEADERS IN YOUR BASKETBALL PROGRAM? – EPISODE 569

Round Table 35

Hello and welcome to the 36th edition of the Coach’s Corner Round Table on the Hoop Heads Podcast. Each episode of the Coach’s Corner Round Table will feature our All-Star lineup of guests answering a single basketball question.  A new Coach’s Corner Round Table will drop around the 15th of each month.

November’s Round Table question is:  How do you develop leaders in your program?

Our Coaching Lineup this month:

Please enjoy this Round Table episode of the Hoop Heads Podcast and once you’re finished listening please give the show a five star rating and review after you subscribe on your favorite podcast app..

If you are a basketball coach at any level please check out our Hoop Heads Coaching Mentorship Program.  You’ll get matched with one of our experienced Head Coaches and develop a relationship that will help take your coaching, your team, your program, and your mindset to another level.

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Let’s hear from our coaches about how they develop leaders in their basketball program.

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TRANSCRIPT FOR ROUND TABLE 36 – HOW DO YOU DEVELOP LEADERS IN YOUR BASKETBALL PROGRAM? – EPISODE 569

[00:00:00] Narrator: [00:00:00] The Hoop Heads Podcast is brought to you by Head Start Basketball.

Mike Klinzing: [00:00:21] Hello, and welcome to the 36th edition of the Coach’s Corner Round Table on the Hoop Heads Podcast. Each episode of the Coach’s Corner Round Table, will feature our [00:03:00] all-star lineup of guests answering a single basketball question, a new Coach’s Corner Round Table will drop around the 15th of each month.

December’s round table question is – How do you develop leaders in your basketball program?

Our Coaching Lineup this month:

Please enjoy this Round Table episode of the Hoop Heads Podcast and once you’re finished listening please give the show a five star rating and review after you subscribe on your favorite podcast app.

Hey Hoop Heads! I wanted to take a minute to shout out our partners and friends at [00:02:00] Dr. Dish Basketball. Their Dr. Dish shooting machines are undoubtedly the most advanced and user-friendly machines on the market. Sign up now for their virtual camp. 2.0 featuring 10 days of workouts with pro trainers from the Dr. Dish family. Learn more at Dr. Dish basketball.com and follow their incredible content @DrDishbball on Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. Mention the Hoop Heads Podcast and save an extra $300 on the Dr. Dish Rebel, All-Star and CT models. Visit DrDishbasketball.com for details. That’s a great deal Hoop Heads! Get your Dr. Dish shooting machine today!

[00:02:08] Dan Evans: Hi, this is Dan Evans, head men’s basketball coach at the University of North Georgia. And you’re listening to the Hoop Heads Podcast.

[00:02:33] Mike Klinzing: Prepare like the pros with the all-new Fast Draw and Fast Scout. Fast Draw has been the number one play diagramming software for coaches for years. You’ll quickly see why Fast Model Sports has the most compelling and intuitive basketball software out there. For a limited time, Fast Model is offering Hoop Heads listeners 15% off Fast Draw and Fast Scout.

Just use the code HHP15 at checkout to grab your discount and you’ll be [00:03:00] on your way to more efficient game prep and improved communication with your team. Fast Model also has new coaching content every week on their blog, plus play and drill diagrams in its play bank. Check out the links in the show notes for more. Fast Model Sports is the best in basketball.

If you’re a basketball coach at any level, please check out our Hoop Heads coaching mentorship program.  You’ll get matched with one of our experienced head coaches and develop a relationship that will take your coaching, your team, your program, and your mindset to another level.

Be sure to follow us on Twitter and Instagram @hoopheadspod for the latest updates on episodes, guests and events from the Hoop Heads Pod.

Are you tired of overpaying for your video and analytics plan? Well, it’s time to check out quickcut.com. A platform built by coaches for coaches. QuickCut is undeniably more affordable. It’s all Cloud-based and it comes packed with features to help high schools and youth programs store, share, and analyze game film.

Make the switch, get double the storage, and save your program up to 50% on the fastest growing video editing system in the country. For more information or to request a free trial visit quick cut.com/basketball. That’s Q W I K [00:04:00] C U T.com.

Let’s hear from our coaches about how they develop leaders in their basketball program.

[00:04:15] Mike Klinzing: Erik Buehler, Chatfield Senior High School, Littleton, Colorado.

[00:04:22] Erik Buehler: Hey, how’s it going Hoop Heads? This is Eric Buehler at Chatfield senior high. And this month we were asked how we develop leaders in our program. I think there’s many ways to do. I think being consistent with it and continuously looking at kids that are coming up in through your program, not just your older kids and giving them skills and pointing them in directions and providing them examples of what a leader looks like is important.

We work very hard in our off season. In our discussions and what leadership roles look like. Do you CA do you follow the vocal leader? Do you follow the person that sets the example sets the tone? Do you have to always be the loudest voice in the room to be a leader, things like that we actually have during school, we have a basketball class that allows us.

To focus on leadership and we go through examples and we talk about situations of what a leader might do in that situation. And then on top of that, we empower the team as much as we possibly can. We empower individuals, we let a player run a drill in practice. We let a player run a huddle during a timeout in practice.

And then as kids get older, we encourage them. B coaches themselves. We have them go coach our youth teams. We have them work, our camps and our clinics and run drills, things like that. So they understand, and they know what it takes to lead. Other people lead their teammates. And then hopefully once they leave us, they learn how to use that leadership and something that’ll actually pay them someday.

So that’s what we do over here at chef. I hope everyone’s doing well out there. It’s fun being back in the season towards the later, but

[00:06:17] Mike Klinzing: Jeff Huber Westlake High School – Westlake, Ohio.

[00:06:24] Jeff Huber: Hi, this is Jeff Huber head boys’ basketball coach at Westlake High School in Westlake Ohio and this month’s question is how do we develop leaders within our program? Great question. You know, one of the things we’ve gone back and forth on is captains. The last couple of years, we did not have captains.

This year we are having captains with a little different process for using a captain’s council idea from a JP nervine. We’re actually as a team, we created a job description. Players had either apply or be nominal. And then were selected from there, voted on by their teammates. And we’re, now that we’ve done that we’re having weekly meetings with those guys and kind of broken up our team into squads that they’re each kind of individually responsible for, to try and create some leadership opportunities for them.

But one of my fear with having captains and part of the reason we didn’t do it in years past was I don’t want it to seem like only those couple of guys are expected to lead. So we also do quite a bit of leadership talk and development with our whole team. We’ve used the lead them up program in years past and are continuing to use that within our.

And then we’ve also just tried to create opportunities to lead. You know, we talk a lot about this idea of being in the. Where, if they’re sensing something in practice their job or their goal is to address it before we, as coaches have to step in and address it. And I heard not too long ago, an interview with a guy who defined leadership and I love the definition.

He said, simply leadership is making the situation better. And I love that because it was so simple. I think sometimes leadership, this idea of leadership can almost seem overwhelming to players. And so we’ve been trying to share that idea with our staff, with our players. If the, in this situation, what could you do to make it better?

And then actually taking that step a is leadership. And so those are some of the things that we’ve been talking about. Some of the things that we’ve been doing that I’m hopeful will have a positive impact this season. Thanks

[00:08:07] Mike Klinzing: Nick LoGalbo – Lane Tech High School, Chicago, Illinois.

[00:08:14] Nick LoGalbo: Hi, this is Nick LoGalbo  from Lane Tech High School in Chicago, Illinois.

Today’s round table question. How do you develop leaders in your program? Another great question and something I reflect on a lot. I think the first thing is that you make sure that your leader. Understand the standards of the program and the vision of the program. And that’s done through one-on-one meetings and conversations and regularly checking in with them before practice, post practice on the bus rides to games about the standards and asking them.

If they feel the standards are being upheld, but I think the other really big thing that I’ve learned over the years is that if you want to empower your leaders to lead, you have to give them the space to lead. And I think that now our leaders understand that when they have something to say in practice, there is space for them to do so when they have something to say during a game, Even in the flow of the huddle that they had the space to do.

So I think early on when I first started coaching, I didn’t understand that. And I dominated all the huddles and the conversation at practice. And I think that was my own insecurities, you know, trying to show them that I knew what I was doing. And now as I’m doing this for a while, realize that. Giving them some space and given the opportunity and practice you know, we work in every practice plan has just different performance questions in debriefing opportunities for our leaders to voice their concerns, opinions, answer questions.

And I think that’s really the big thing, the big key. So anyway, hope that answers the question and excited to hear what everyone else has to say. Hope.

[00:09:50] Mike Klinzing: Matt Monroe St. Ignatius College Prep in Chicago, Illinois.

[00:09:58] Matt Monroe: Well, some of your players may have natural leadership ability. Leadership is something that needs to be taught. Developing effective leaders. Not only has a positive impact on your team, but it gives your players a tool to help them be successful. Beyond the basketball court, developing leadership is something you have to be intentional.

It takes time, effort, planning, and patience. One of the best ways to develop leadership during a season is to manufacture opportunities for your players to lead as often as possible, whether it’s given them a voice at team meetings, having them lead drills at practice involving them in game planning, or seeking their input regarding issues involving your team.

It’s important to empower your players to lead as much as you can. Some of the things we do in our program that are unique, include holding weekly meetings in the off season with returning. Having seniors plan and lead a be more talk, which our weekly character building meetings. We have our in our program meeting with each individual player in the entire program.

Once the season ends or having seniors plan and lead an entire program wide practice during the season, whatever you decide to do, it’s important to be intentional about building a culture where players have ownership in your program and truly feel like their voices are being heard after all a player led program is much better than a coach led program.

[00:11:16] Mike Klinzing: Matthew Raidbard, author of Lead like a Pro.

[00:11:23] Matthew Raidbard: Hi everyone. This is Matthew Raidbard, former men’s college basketball coach. Really excited to be here again on the hoops head round table. Talking about how you develop leaders in your program. This is an extremely important question to me. Leadership is something that I’m really passionate about helping coaches with their leadership practice.

You know, how coaches develop leaders in their program is a really essential part of helping their program be successful and helping their athletes be successful. And I think coaches should do this by allowing space for their athletes to be able to develop their leadership. And then the main way I encourage coaches to do that is by creating that space for their athletes, to be able to take on leadership roles for themselves.

And one way to do that is for coaches to be conscious of not always filling the leadership space themselves immediately. So when coaches see something really good happen at practice or something, that’s very obvious that they need to correct instead of automatically praising it or automatically correcting it.

I encourage coaches. Give it a second, give their athletes a moment to jump into that leadership space and praise one another, or help correct one another in a constructive way. Obviously you want to facilitate things so that that’s done in a way that is healthy and doesn’t corrode your team culture, but that’ll help your athletes be able to develop their leadership abilities and be comfortable in that space.

If you’re finding that athletes, aren’t naturally going into that space themselves, try prompting your athletes to step into that space and be comfortable. Oftentimes they’ll a lot of them will know the answer or know what happened. They just won’t be comfortable jumping to that leadership space yet, particularly if you have a young or a new team, so you might need to prompt them to enter that space by saying, you know, something really great happened on that play or.

We need to make a correction on that play, who knows what happened, who knows what went right or wrong and help them into that space. By doing that repeatedly over time, the leadership abilities of your athletes are going to take off. And the success of your team is going to take off as well, because not all the leadership is coming from the coaches.

And oftentimes that leadership that comes from the athletes can be so powerful and influential and really help your team be successful.

[00:13:41] Mike Klinzing: Don Showalter – USA basketball.

[00:13:47] Don Showalter: Hi, Don Showalter here from USA basketball. The question for today this month is how do you develop leadership in your team? I think several different ways we try and develop a really good leadership is first of all, a use leadership terms. With your team, like for instance, like I would tell our players use your leadership voice.

So it projects a usual leader, you know, where’s your leadership stance. When you’re, when you’re visiting with your head, shouldn’t be down your eyes should be looking at the person you’re talking to. That’s, you know, that’s li that’s showing leadership. So we use a lot of leadership terminology in practice.

Leadership voice leadership stance. We comment a lot of times on players that are showing great leaders, being great leaders. For instance if somebody picks up basketballs who say, that’s what she’ll be in a way to show, to be a great leader. So it’s little stuff like that. I think it really helps your team understand what leadership is.

And then we never tell a players, like we say, good in two lines are getting three lines. We never tell them who’s calling. We always, we always want to see who’s a leader. And so we’ll, we’ll comment on that by saying, Hey, Jimmy would it be, would it be a leader and get to the front of the line? So I think those things are really important to develop leadership in your team.

The other thing is I think put them through very difficult, tough situations in practice. You’ll see who your leaders are. We like to start when we maybe we’ll start a scrimmage with one team down by six or eight points. And see a thing, come back and win the game or come back and, and make the game close.

And then we comment on all right, how did that happen? Who are the leaders that made that happen? So I think that’s really a strong point too, is how do you get your team to show leadership and practices by making a practice out of their comfort zone, you may practice out of their comfort zone by doing cutthroat competition.

A lot of, a lot of competitive drills really brings the. That leadership voice out. And so I think those are some of the ways that we really try and develop a leadership within within our team. Thanks,

[00:16:04] Mike Klinzing: John Shulman – University of Alabama, Huntsville and the 720 sports group.

[00:16:10] John Shulman: This is the John Shulman head basketball coach at the University of Alabama in Huntsville.

And the question is how do you develop leaders in your program? Pretty good question. Not easy to do, you know, I’ve coached for 30, I guess 35 years, total eight years in high school. W four year step when I was young four years when I was a little older, probably easier to develop leaders in high school than in college that are kind of already made kind of who they are when they get to college.

But I’m a big believer. You know, a player led team is, is much better than a coach led team developing leaders. You know, as, as a coach, you want full control. And if you want to develop leaders within your program, you have to give up some of that control. I will promise you, I will ask a kid into the game situation.

If I trust him on, on what the, that we’re going to play in a late game situation. It better be the one that I’ll walk, but it feels like it’s his idea. I think you can go to kids and, and put the oldest on them and what we need to work on. And somebody going to say, coach, we need to work on boxing out. And, and those kids that answer, I just think the more you ask questions and the more you give them input, the more leadership abilities will come out in a future.

We’d all love to have a team full of leaders, but then they ain’t going to happen. So somebody going to come up who answers your question? Who answers your question and film? Who’s paying attention and Phil. The more you ask questions of, or somebody’s going to step up and, and make that decision on where you got to get better.

What’s wrong here. What’s wrong there. So I think just asking questions in film, asking questions in practice of who’s winning the sprints who is first, you know, I, we need eight. We need eight over here on this side. We need eight on this. Who’s the kid going, Hey, y’all come over here. Who’s, you know, instead of doing everything is kind of like being a parent, you know, instead of doing everything for your kid, put the oldest on your kid and make sure that your child is, is, is doing things for himself or herself.

And that just makes them an adult helps them become. Same thing with the basketball team helps them become a leader. Hope this helps a little bit. It’s a good question. That’s a hard question, but I would, I would ask a lot of questions in practice. I would give them as much ownership in practice as you could and on your team.

And I think you’ll develop leaders of that way.

[00:19:13] Mike Klinzing: Andy Winters, Head Men’s Basketball Coach at Otterbein University.

[00:19:22] Andy Winters: At Otterbein, we develop leaders in a couple of different ways. We look at it as the development, as a person, the development, as a student in the development as employer. And our job is as a person in our leadership seminars, we have a leadership council which talks about different issues, which talks on leadership skills and how we can improve.

We have an ambassadors of Otterbein seminar, which we bring back different alumni who are in leadership positions that can speak on real life experiences outside of just basketball. And then we do a lot of service projects, more we’re given back and we’re able to. You know, lead in different ways that aren’t always vocal or on the basketball court.

The second thing is our development as a student in, in those leadership, you know, we, we talk about our academics and how we can, you know, improve on that and be better students through study tables internship co-op opportunities, making the grade reports, which is, you know do an academic checks.

So making sure we’re leaders staying on top of that, and then our development as a player in our leadership model on the basketball court, in the weight room in the film room, talks a lot about how we can improve as a basketball player in the, each player can be a leader. And the more leaders you have on the team, the better your team is because guys lead in different ways.

In that way everybody’s leading in their own way with a common goal Continuing to improve and grow and work on our daily habits.

[00:20:49] Mike Klinzing: Thanks for checking out this month’s Hoop Heads Podcast Round Table. We’ll be back next month with another question for our all-star lineup of coaches. [00:21:04]

Narrator: Thanks for listening to the Hoop Heads Podcast presented by Head Start Basketball.